Tur Medical Center - Vaccines and Lab testing

MMR

Measles - Mumps - Rubella


The MMR vaccine (also known as the MPR vaccine) is an immunization vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles).

Meningococcal

  

CDC recommends routine meningococcal conjugate vaccination for:

· All preteens and teens at 11 to 12 years old with a booster dose at 16

· Children and adults at increased risk for meningococcal disease

CDC recommends routine serogroup B meningococcal vaccination for

· People 10 years or older at increased risk for meningococcal disease

Td

Tetanus ~ Diptheria


CDC recommends routine meningococcal conjugate vaccination for:

· All preteens and teens at 11 to 12 years old with a booster dose at 16

· Children and adults at increased risk for meningococcal disease

CDC recommends routine serogroup B meningococcal vaccination for

· People 10 years or older at increased risk for meningococcal disease

Rotavirus

Not required for most adults. Rotavirus vaccine is the best way to protect your child against rotavirus disease. Most children (about 9 out of 10) who get the vaccine will be protected from severe rotavirus disease. 

Pneumococcal

CDC recommends pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for all children younger than 2 years old, all adults 65 years or older, and people 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions. CDC recommends pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for all adults 65 years or older, people 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions,

Tur Medical Center - Vaccines and Lab testing

Varicella (chicken pox)

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Two doses of the vaccine are about 90% effective at preventing chickenpox. 

OPV/IPV

Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is the only polio vaccine that has been given in the United States since 2000. It is given by shot in the arm or leg, depending on the person’s age. CDC recommends that children get four doses of polio vaccine.

Polio vaccination is also recommended for adults who are at greater risk for exposure to polioviruses, including international travelers, laboratory workers, and healthcare professionals.

Antibody Testing

Available instead of vaccines but is an additional charge

Syphilis

Blood Test 

Tuberculosis

Skin Test 

Gonorrhea

Urine Test 

Flu (Influenza) Vaccine

What is the flu (influenza)?

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often experience fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, and fatigue (tiredness). 


Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.Some people, such as senior citizens, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year with a flu shot.


  

What is the flu shot?


The "flu shot" is an inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that's given with a needle, usually in the arm.This season's vaccine protects against the three influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the season. This includes an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus.


The vaccine takes effect approximately two weeks after it has been administered as antibodies (substances in the blood that protect against infection) accumulate and provide protection against influenza. Therefore, you may be susceptible to influenza during the two weeks after your flu shot.


Who should get a flu shot?


The CDC recommends everyone ages 6 months and older* get a flu shot this season, including healthy people, and people with chronic conditions. In general, it is recommended that anyone who wants to reduce his or her chances of getting the flu should be vaccinated. It's especially important for some people to get vaccinated, including:

  • People who are at high risk of developing serious complications like pneumonia if they get sick with the flu. This includes: 
    • People who have certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease
    • Pregnant women
    • People 65 years and older
  • People who live with or care for others who are at high risk for developing serious complications. This includes household contacts and caregivers of people with certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease.